Society’s “little platoons” for conservation

aspensI’ve just finished a new book that is a must read for the political right (and for those on the political left who may be interested in what conservatives think about environmental issues).  Roger Scruton’s “How to Think Seriously About the Planet: The Case for an Environmental Conservatism”  is a page turner on why conservatives need not shy away from advocating environmental protections; rather they should embrace the topic and advocate for approaches that not only advance environmental stewardship but conservatism.  In a recent book review by Peter Blair over at The Witherspoon Institute, Blair critiques:

Conservatism aims to preserve and maintain renewal of [homeostatic] systems, especially the “civil associations” that Scruton calls society’s “little platoons,” in the words of Edmund Burke. The little platoons—families, local clubs and institutions, churches and schools—keep us accountable to ourselves and our environment, teaching us how to “interact as free beings, each taking responsibility for his actions.” Daily life in these civil associations assimilates and connects us to a settled home, a place and a people we identify as peculiarly “ours.” Continue reading

Why Conservatives Should and do Care About the Environment

What can be more conservative than the impulse to protect and conserve earth’s natural resources, air, water, and land, which give and sustain life.  Just as political conservatism is deeply rooted in the philosophy of providing stability and continuity in our political and social institutions, environmental conservatism is rooted in the notion of promoting and conserving those earthly tendrils that sustain life on earth.   Continue reading